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The anxiously awaited CBO score of the AHCA – reflecting the last round of changes made to the bill before it was passed – was released yesterday afternoon. The nonpartisan scorekeeping office forecast the AHCA would cut the federal deficit by $119 billion over the next 10 years, down from $150 billion in the prior score. From a process perspective, the bill still easily passed the test to save at least $2 billion to qualify for consideration under a reconciliation process that is filibuster-proof by requiring only 51 votes in the Senate, not the typical 60-vote threshold.

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Many Americans and employers agree that a top priority for President Trump and Congress should be lowering prescription drug costs. That was underscored this week with introduction of bipartisan legislation – the Fair Drug Pricing Act – a step in the direction of greater price transparency. The bill would require drug makers to justify their pricing and itemize their expenses before raising prices more than 10% in one year, or 25% over three years, on drugs that cost at least $100. (Remember the EpiPen controversy from last year?) Shortly after receipt of this pricing information, HHS would be required to make the data publicly available. In addition to providing a check on sharp price hikes, this could help PBMs and other drug purchasers make more informed decisions.

 

The Fair Drug Pricing Act mimics bills that have been introduced in more than a dozen state legislatures, and a growing number of state and federal lawmakers have offered a variety of proposals to address the issue. Congressional Democrats, for example, have proposed to allow Medicare to negotiate prices, remove tax breaks drug makers receive for advertising expenses, speed generic drugs to market, and allow Americans to import medicines from Canada, among other things.

 

The pharmaceutical industry opposes and will fight most of the proposals, but it’s clear that the industry and policymakers are feeling the heat over drug prices.

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Republican senators will continue discussions this week on revisions to legislation narrowly approved by the House -– the American Health Care Act – to repeal and replace much of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Passing a bill out of the Senate may be an even tougher fight for Republicans, who can’t afford more than two defections.

 

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Earlier this week we learned that the CBO will release their “score” of the AHCA the week of May 22. This revised projection will reflect the most recent changes to the bill – allowing states to opt-out of certain provisions including essential health benefits, aspects of community rating and changes to age banding ratios as well as $8 billion in funding to help states that choose to waive the ACA's community rating for individuals who don't have continuous coverage.

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The vote to pass the AHCA in the House – a first step on the road to repealing the ACA – has raised questions about how employers might respond if the ACA requirements affecting employer-sponsored plans were to be lifted. One way to approach that question is to look at how employer plans changed – and how they didn’t change – under the ACA. We went back to past Mercer National Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Plans databases to find out.

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Well, it happened. House Republicans got the votes to send the AHCA on to the Senate. The bill will face tough challenges in the Senate, so this is far from a done deal. For now, it is business as usual under the ACA.

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House Republican leaders are working to win the votes needed to pass a revised version of their health care reform bill, the American Health Care Act (AHCA), that aims to lower health insurance premiums for some individuals by letting states obtain waivers to opt out of the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) essential health benefits, community rating, and age banding requirements.

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It has been a month since the American Health Care Act was pulled because House Republicans lacked the votes to advance it to the Senate. Here’s a run-down of all that has happened since then, including our perspective on what it means to employers.

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The stalled House ACA repeal and replace effort means the next crucial decision about the ACA’s future will probably be made by the White House. Following the canceled vote on the American Health Care Act (AHCA), the immediate concern on the health reform front is whether President Trump is serious about his threat to let the ACA “explode” – to use his term.

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Just a few days after the dramatic collapse of efforts to pass the House GOP’s American Health Care Act, more than 1,300 folks with an interest in employer-sponsored health benefits joined a Mercer webcast* to learn a) what the heck just happened, b) now what, and c) what does this mean for employer health benefits? A team from our Washington Resource Group aced the first question and gave as good a look into the future as possible without a crystal ball. 

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After their failed attempt to pass ACA repeal and replace legislation, President Trump and House Speaker Ryan indicated that they were “moving on” to other legislative priorities. On Tuesday, we learned that Republicans have restarted their conversations about healthcare. On Wednesday, Bloomberg reported the GOP was discussing a new vote as early as next week.

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A couple of weeks ago (feels like ages) we launched a brief survey to find out where employers stood on specific provisions in the House GOP repeal-and replace-bill, the American Health Care Act (AHCA). We closed the survey on Thursday with more than 900 responses.  As I was reviewing the results on Friday, the bill was apparently dying -- but now House leaders and President Trump are signaling that it may be revived. Either way, the health reform debate is far from over, and many of the provisions introduced in the AHCA will likely remain part of the discussion.

 

The survey asked health benefit professionals how key provisions would affect their organization’s health benefit program, employees, and business success -- as opposed to how they might affect the individual market or people without access to employer-sponsored health insurance. They could also respond that the provision would not affect their organization one way or the other. 

 

HSA changes, repeal of employer mandate seen as positive

We didn’t ask for an overall opinion of the bill, but employers’ reactions to individual provisions added up to a less-than-ringing endorsement. To start with what they liked: 66% said that liberalizing HSA rules -- such as allowing higher contributions -- would have a positive effect on their organizations. That’s in the ballpark of the percentage of large employers nationally that offer HSA-eligible plans (53% in 2016). If you don’t offer an HSA-eligible plan and don’t intend to, or if you do offer one but none of your employees are likely to hit the maximum account contribution, you might not believe this provision would have much of an impact, like 29% of our respondents. 

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