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Mercer

It is hard to argue that employers have not done a pretty good job in recent years managing cost. The threat of the excise tax obviously had something to do with that, and keeping health benefit cost growth to about 4% annually has required some effort. We at Mercer think we have helped our clients make some great strides in the fight to manage health care cost and improve quality with initiatives like Mercer Complete Care, a personalized advocacy and clinical care solution, and our new Specialty Pharmacy PBM Carve-out offering. We have also implemented Quality Improvement Collaboratives (QIC) in several metropolitan areas across the country to bring employers together with providers to improve the quality of hospital care.

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This post is part of our “Driving Transformation” series, in which Mercer consultants share key take-aways for employers from the 2016 Oliver Wyman Health Innovation Summit, a recent conference hosted by Mercer’s sibling firm, management consultant Oliver Wyman.  

 

The rise of the consumer has already caused a seismic shift in the strategic direction for most hospitals and health systems. These providers recognize the imperative to find new and different ways to demonstrate value across the care delivery continuum. This means focusing attention on what consumers of most products and services look for: cost, quality and an engaging and convenient experience. Integrated clinical and commercial strategies must be developed to successfully address each of these elements.  With increased focus on improving population health and patient satisfaction, re-thinking how multi-generational consumers access healthcare providers will be critical to future success. There will be various patient-centric “front doors” to healthcare, including retail health, telemedicine, onsite clinics, digital health, care navigation and a re-invented doctor’s office experience.

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This post is part of our “Driving Transformation” series, in which Mercer consultants share key take-aways for employers from the 2016 Oliver Wyman Health Innovation Summit, a recent conference hosted by Mercer’s sibling firm, management consultant Oliver Wyman.  

 

One idea that was explored in great depth at the conference was that the transformation of healthcare will be driven by the consumer. But how would that work when consumers don’t really speak with a single voice? Can true transformation occur when every consumer is different, with unique preferences? In fact personalized healthcare is happening already and research is showing some encouraging results.

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This post is part of our “Driving Transformation” series, in which Mercer consultants share key take-aways for employers from the 2016 Oliver Wyman Health Innovation Summit, a recent conference hosted by Mercer’s sibling firm, management consultant Oliver Wyman.  

 

Prepared or not, a new healthcare market is emerging. Every stakeholder group operating in the healthcare ecosystem is changing. We’re seeing the simultaneous consolidation and fragmentation of carriers and providers, continuous introduction of tech start-ups bringing entirely new design mind-sets, and tumultuous evolution of the public exchange. Employers, who play the pivotal role of providing coverage for more than 60% of all those insured in the US today, are adopting new, aggressive strategies to shape the rules of the road in the new healthcare landscape.

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This post is part of our “Driving Transformation” series, in which Mercer consultants share key take-aways for employers from the 2016 Oliver Wyman Health Innovation Summit, a recent conference hosted by Mercer’s sibling firm, management consultant Oliver Wyman.

 

In this blog post, Oliver Wyman’s Terry Stone discusses how to fix the healthcare consumer experience. Despite abundant effort to address the industry shortcomings, she asserts that we haven’t spent enough time addressing the root-cause issues. Success lies in understanding the consumers’ needs and solving their problems. More than ever before, healthcare consumers expect us to stop making the complexity of the system their problem. So the next time you are addressing a change to your health plan, ask if the change makes it easier for your employees to access the right care at the right time.

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This post is part of our “Driving Transformation” series, in which Mercer consultants share key take-aways for employers from the 2016 Oliver Wyman Health Innovation Summit, a recent conference hosted by Mercer’s sibling firm, management consultant Oliver Wyman.

  

At many points throughout the conference, with its deep focus on a “consumer-led transformation” of health care, I was challenged to think about a fundamental element of such a transformation: consumer behavior change.  Can we really teach healthcare consumerism skills? Can we instill a sense of shared accountability for health within a patient, who may have little or no financial “skin in the game”? And if we’re successful moving the needle on healthcare consumerism skills and sharing responsibility for prudent healthcare decisions, can these skills and responsibilities be called upon in the exceptional situations where healthcare is complex, emotional, and high risk? After all, these are the situations that account for the majority of healthcare costs.

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This post is part of our “Driving Transformation” series, in which Mercer consultants share key take-aways for employers from the 2016 Oliver Wyman Health Innovation Summit, a recent conference hosted by Mercer’s sibling firm, management consultant Oliver Wyman.  

 

A session focused on the power and promise of genomics was of particular interest to employers at the conference. Industry leaders discussed how genetic testing has now passed the price-vs.-utility intersection, making genetic assessments a potentially powerful tool to better identify health risks and target treatment for particular conditions. 

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