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Mercer

Here’s an employee advocating for her own health: Before a medical appointment, she checks her health insurance to make sure the visit is covered. During the visit, she takes notes. Before the doctor writes the prescription, she asks, “Are there any generics?”

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Early results from a Mercer survey made headlines this week with the news that employers are projecting that per-employee health benefit cost will rise by an average of 4% next year after they make planned changes. That’s in line with the moderate cost increases we’ve been seeing over the past few years. What was more eye-opening was finding that underlying cost growth -- the change in cost employers would see if they made no changes -- has slowed to just 5.5%. That’s a gap of just 1.5 percentage points -- the smallest we’ve seen yet.

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Open enrollment season is just around the corner, and HR professionals at companies of all sizes should be preparing to share benefit details with their employees as part of their 2017 enrollment process. Questions and some confusion are inevitable, but there are ways to make sure open enrollment goes smoothly:

 

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When employers are working on strategies to manage health benefit cost, behavioral health benefits aren’t often top of mind. After all, only about 4% of claims are related to treatment for behavioral health problems.  But what’s missing from that picture are claims for comorbid conditions – other health problems that go along with the mental illness or behavioral health issues.  According to one analysis, together these account for 22% of total medical spend. [1]

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The nonprofit organization Catalyst for Payment Reform is hosting a series of webcasts this month focused on “Addressing Today's Leading Challenges.” I was invited to cover behavioral health -- specifically, the changing behavioral health landscape for employers and the need to develop innovative strategies to bend the cost trend and improve care.

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One way to improve engagement is to provide plan members with their own personal “health guide”.  Mercer is helping plan sponsors do that a couple of different ways. Mercer also just announced an alliance with Accolade: Mercer Complete Care, powered by Accolade. Check out this interview with our leader of specialty consulting services, Jean Moore, and Rob Cavanaugh from Accolade as they provide their perspective on the alliance and why we think it has the potential to enhance engagement. Now is a good time to consider the tools you are providing your employees and family members to help them access the right health care, and how that is working to support smart consumerism and effective use of care.

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There was an interesting study published in JAMA this week that compares the health status of low-income individuals in two states that expanded Medicaid (Arkansas and Kentucky) with a state that did not (Texas). Respondents in Arkansas and Kentucky were 5% more likely to than their peers in Texas to say they were in excellent health at the end of 2015. This is a wider gap than was seen when the same question was asked at the end of 2014, when Medicare expansion was a year old. Because it takes time for someone to benefit from having insurance – due to the time it takes to actually get care and then for the care to have a positive impact on health – we may see continued improvement in Arkansas and Kentucky relative to Texas. While the study does not prove that Medicaid expansion caused people to be healthier, it makes sense that having insurance would have a positive impact on one’s health. This made me wonder whether the ACA has also had a positive impact on the health of those in employer-sponsored plans. Certainly the mandate for 100% coverage for preventive care comes to mind, although many employers covered preventive care prior to the ACA (and utilization is still not what we would like to see). Will the individual mandate mean more individuals seek coverage in employer-sponsored group coverage, and will that in turn result in better health in the workforce? Ultimately, it may be that because so many aspects of employer-sponsored coverage have changed since the law passed, it will be difficult to attribute any change in the health status of employed Americans (good or bad) to the ACA.

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This interesting piece in Kaiser Health News sheds some light on a real gap in healthcare: Physicians are barely trained in medical school on how to identify and treat addiction. In fact, only a few hours in the course of four years of medical school are devoted to teaching addiction medicine. Schools have been so slow to change that medical students at Harvard University, for example, have started conducting their own training on how to buy and administer drugs that reverse the effects of an overdose. And Stanford’s medical school adjusted its curriculum so that lectures on addiction will no longer be folded into the psychiatry series as a side note, but instead will be presented as a separate unit, relevant to future doctors in any subspecialty – and that training will continue when the students leave the classrooms for clinical rotations. As the story notes, medical schools have traditionally avoided teaching about addiction, partly because so many doctors have viewed it not as a disease but as a vice resistant to treatment in a medical context. But as this outmoded view fades, pressure is being put on medical schools to expand their curriculum in this area. While this is good news for employer sponsored plans, it will obviously take time for providers to be better trained on addiction treatment.

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In late May, Martin Senn, the former CEO of Zurich Insurance Group, took his own life just months after leaving the company. Only three years earlier, the company's former CFO, Pierre Wauthier, also committed suicide, and not long after that, so did Swisscom CEO Carsten Schloter.

 

 

 

 

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The thinking on financial wellness has evolved a lot in the last few years. It’s no longer just about planning for retirement—it’s about how to make progress towards goals and reach financial independence. In a diverse employee population, people are in different life stages and have different mindsets, which affect their financial concerns. Here are five tangible ideas to start a conversation about financial health in your workplace to bring about positive change.

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The latest and top iPhone App – Pokémon Go – has some unexpected health benefits. The new app from Nintendo (that’s right, the makers of Wii and Wii Fit) requires users to walk around outside and capture the Pokémon around them. The app has users walking, running, and jumping through their neighborhoods to capture the Pokémon. Check out the description in this Mobi Health News article. Perhaps this app will inspire your next workplace wellness challenge.

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I was interested to read about a Harris poll on millennials’ savings priorities. The good news is that they are saving – in fact, they are saving more than their Gen X counterparts. The not-so-good news is that they have a lot of priorities that come before saving for retirement – and they’re hoping to retire, on average, at a youthful age 62! Just another nudge for employers to step up communications encouraging optimal use of all the employer-sponsored benefits and provide tools to support effective financial planning. We’re not talking about adding new benefits – just better packaging and communications for higher employee engagement and appreciation.

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