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Mercer

The move from fee for service to payment for value is real. This blog post on the Health Affairs site provides a glimpse into the progress being made with this new approach to contracting with providers. I was struck by one sentence in particular – Patients are the most underutilized resource to help reach positive medical outcomes. Since 155 million Americans are covered by employer-sponsored health plans, employers are in a unique position to be able to influence patient behavior. With the advent of consumer-directed health plans, health advocacy and other well-being programs, we have made strides in promoting consumerism and empowering patients. While we have a long way to go to get plan members more comfortable and confident in this role, there’s a big potential upside.

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You won’t find many business leaders who would disagree that a healthy work-life balance is important for employee well-being and ultimately good for business. But when I looked at the most recent results from the HERO Health and Well-being Scorecard in Collaboration with Mercer, only 22% of the nearly 500 respondents say that their organization’s leaders are role models for prioritizing health and work/life balance – for example, they don’t send e-mail while on vacation. When I mentioned this disturbing statistic to my colleague Tracy, she pointed me to a recent WSJ article in which Marsh & McLennan CEO Dan Glaser discusses his approach to work-life balance. Over time, he says, he got better at keeping work and family life separate, but he wishes he’d figured it out sooner: “Your kids are only young once, and you can’t get that moment back,” he said. Others quoted in the article acknowledged the importance of setting an example for employees rising in the ranks. “It is critical for the CEO to set the tone,” said one exec. “If he doesn’t, there’s a secret kind of code, ‘if you take vacation, you’re not as serious an executive.’ ”

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There’s been a lot of discussion lately  about the gig economy. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 15 million people in US were self-employed in 2015. It is predicted that by 2020 more than 40% of the workforce (60 million people) will be independent workers – freelancers, contractors, temporary employees. Harvard Business Review called it “the rise of the super-temp” and predicted that – perhaps contrary to current perceptions – these contractor positions will be held by the best and the brightest. There are even new platforms to pair talent with businesses, like Contently, Hourly Nerd, Field Nation, and our own Mercer PeoplePro.

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