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Mercer

The new Mercer Survey on Absence and Disability Management found that employers continue to embrace workplace flexibility, in part demonstrated by a migration from traditional vacation/sick plans to paid time off (PTO plans). PTO plans are now in place in 63% of the organizations surveyed, up from 50% in 2013 and 38% in 2010. PTO plans provide employees more flexibility and reduce the need to determine (and track) what type of day off is being taken.

 

But despite their focus on time off, many employees do not use all of the days available to them: 44% of participants report that their employees take less than 80% of their allotted PTO time. And for the growing number of employees who work remotely, time off may not truly be time away from work. Employers are rethinking time-off program design to take into account all of these dynamics and help employees to achieve a healthier work/life balance.

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Congress has passed legislation to increase enforcement of mental health and substance abuse parity rules and require health plans to apply parity standards to eating disorder benefits as part of a sweeping bill intended to spur development of new drugs and medical devices. The 21st Century Cures Act also includes provisions to let small employers use health reimbursement accounts (HRAs) to cover employees' costs for individual-market health insurance on a tax-free basis. The measure is expected to be signed into law by President Obama.

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Last week, The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation released new data showing only one in four Americans favor repeal of the ACA. About half of the respondents want Congress to leave the ACA alone or make it bigger and stronger. Contrast that with the results from our latest Mercer poll, where 63% of participating employers said they favored repeal-and-replace of the ACA; only 15% said they oppose; and 22% said they don't have an opinion yet. Why the difference? When pondering repeal, employers may be hoping for elimination of the cost and administrative burdens imposed by the ACA, where individuals may be concerned about losing some of the protections afforded by the ACA – for example, the ban on pre-existing coverage exclusions and coverage eligibility to age 26.

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Signaling that he is serious about rolling back the ACA, President-elect Donald Trump has chosen Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.), one of Capitol Hill's fiercest critics of President Obama's health care law, to be Secretary of Health and Human Services. Price, an orthopedic surgeon and Chair of the House Budget Committee, is the author of one of the Republican ACA replacement plans, Empowering Patients First, which you can read about here.

 

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You remember the old algebra formulas from school: 3X + 2 = 11. Solve for X.

 

 

Now you’re solving problems in the business world. If you’re in charge of health benefits, solving for “X” means: Solve for lower premiums. Solve for more choice. Solve for higher quality, more efficiency, and better adherence.

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IRS Notice 2016-70 extends the 2017 deadline from Jan. 31 to March 2 for employers and insurers to furnish individual statements on 2016 health coverage and full-time employee status (Forms 1095-B and 1095-C). The notice also extends 2015 penalty relief to 2016 incorrect or incomplete reports due in 2017 if the preparer has made good-faith efforts to comply. The extension does not change the Feb. 28 (paper) and March 31 (electronic) IRS filing deadlines.

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With the election behind us, the news is full of speculation about what will happen next. We hosted a webcast for employers two days after the election and had a record turnout, taking the opportunity to conduct a quick opinion poll about repealing and replacing the ACA and other possible legislative actions by the new president and the 115th Congress.

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A campaign promise to repeal the ACA is one thing, while figuring out how to dismantle the massive law with its many far-reaching elements is quite another. This Washington Post article discusses the paths Trump and Congress could take to walk back various parts of the healthcare reform law. According to the article, the GOP majorities in both chambers are likely to use the reconciliation process to overturn key aspects of the ACA that involve federal spending, such as the subsidies granted to millions of working Americans to help them pay for health coverage. But reversing other parts of the law, such as its insurance marketplaces, or instituting various Republican-backed healthcare approaches, would require a political path that could be more arduous. The ACA rules that affect employer-sponsored health plans are not grabbing the headlines and don’t get much ink in this article, either.  But the message for employers that’s emerging is that this Band-aid will be coming off slowly. It’s not too soon to start thinking about how to position your program for the changes ahead. 

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Your new employee is 26 years old. He’s rarely sick -- maybe some occasional weekend-warrior soreness. His biggest health expense is his refrigerator full of grape Mountain Dew Kickstarts.

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Last night’s vote was about change, but what will Donald Trump’s presidency mean for healthcare benefits?  The ACA will almost certainly change, although it is unclear if we will see full repeal or a major overhaul.  With that said, Republicans won’t want to risk the backlash of kicking 25 million constituents off their plans. The task at hand is to “fix” the parts of the ACA that are ineffective.  At this point, here’s what we think we know:

 

  • The popular features of the ACA will likely remain, such as expanded eligibility for dependent children to age 26; the ban on pre-existing condition limits; and the closed gap in Medicare prescription coverage
  • Repeal of the excise tax could become a reality -- but would a cap on the employee tax exclusion take its place?
  • We’ll see a laser focus on how to create new, competitive markets for individuals who don’t get coverage through their employer or public programs, with Trump favoring individual tax preferences
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As the latest Mercer National Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Plans shows, more employers are offering employees tools to make more informed healthcare decisions. Among the largest employers (those with 20,000 or more employees), 28% provided transparency tools through a specialty vendor in 2016, up from just 15% two years ago. An additional 62% say their health plan provides some type of transparency tool. 

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This post is part of our “Driving Transformation” series, in which Mercer consultants share key take-aways for employers from the 2016 Oliver Wyman Health Innovation Summit, a recent conference hosted by Mercer’s sibling firm, management consultant Oliver Wyman.

 

In this blog post, Oliver Wyman’s Terry Stone discusses how to fix the healthcare consumer experience. Despite abundant effort to address the industry shortcomings, she asserts that we haven’t spent enough time addressing the root-cause issues. Success lies in understanding the consumers’ needs and solving their problems. More than ever before, healthcare consumers expect us to stop making the complexity of the system their problem. So the next time you are addressing a change to your health plan, ask if the change makes it easier for your employees to access the right care at the right time.

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